Vendini’s Guide to the 2017 Tony Awards

Anthony Gordon Entertainment

The 2017 Tony Awards are upon us and we couldn’t be more excited. Ever since its television debut in 1967, the Tony Awards have been the single biggest national showcase for presenting new theatrical works to the public. For people who book shows for a living, seeing what’s made an impact on Broadway helps guide decisions about which productions to present in their own theaters. As America’s leading ticketing partner for independent theaters and playhouses, we’ll be watching the 2017 Tony Awards with a keen interest in how this year’s nominees will affect our industry in the months to come.

In an attempt to harness some of our Tony fever, we got together to present you with our own (unofficial) 2017 Tony Awards preview and viewing guide. To make things a little more interesting, we’re inviting you to compete against us to see who can pick the most 2017 Tony Awards winners. Think you have what it takes to match the theater geeks at Vendini? If you can pick more winners than we can, you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a $50 American Express gift card! Click the button below to receive your own unofficial Tony Awards ballot and enter for your chance to win.


VENDINI’S (UNOFFICIAL) 2017 TONY AWARDS BALLOT

Just a few quick notes about the guide before we dive in…

  • Included in this guide is a complete preview of what to look for in every single category, as well as our picks to win. Click on any of the links in this story to learn more about the nominees.
  • We picked our favorites to win primarily based on informal polling of folks around our offices who have seen all of the nominated shows. We also did a ton of research based on the leading publications covering the 2017 Tony Awards.
  • Our intention in picking winners isn’t to suggest the other nominees are any less deserving of glory. We just love a good, old-fashioned horse race. 

We’ll be live tweeting from @Vendini during the west coast feed of the 2017 Tony Awards on Sunday, June 11 at 5pm PST, so please make sure to follow us on Twitter. Without any further ado, we hope you enjoy Vendini’s (unofficial) guide to the 2017 Tony Awards.


Best Musical

“Come From Away” | Review
“Dear Evan Hansen” | Review
“Groundhog Day the Musical” | Review
“Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Review

What to Look for: This year’s field is particularly interesting because of the incredibly diverse, and somewhat obscure, topics of each of these musicals. “Come From Away” is a feel-good musical about airline passengers forced to disembark in a remote Newfoundland town on 9/11. “Dear Evan Hansen” is a hopeful coming of age story (despite a storyline revolving around mental health issues and teenage suicide.) “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” takes its operatic story from a tiny sliver of Tolstoy’s epic novel, “War and Peace.” And “Groundhog Day the Musical” is the musical audiences have been demanding since the film came out in 1993 (just kidding, but it is a pleasant and unexpected surprise).

Vendini’s Pick to Win: “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812

Best Musical Nominee: “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”


Best Play

“A Doll’s House, Part 2,” Lucas Hnath | Review
“Indecent,” Paula Vogel | Review
“Oslo,” J.T. Rogers | Review
“Sweat,” Lynn Nottage | Review

What to Look for: Hollywood power players Barry Diller and Scott Rudin produced “A Doll’s House, Part 2,” a sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s groundbreaking play from 1879. It received glowing reviews but nevertheless underperformed at the box office. Maybe waiting 138 years to follow up the original play didn’t help.

One of the most respected playwrights in the world, Paula Vogel, made her Broadway debut this year with “Indecent.” We suspect there’s a block of voters who have been waiting for the opportunity to honor her. J.T. Rogers’ “Olso” tells the true story behind the 1993 Oslo Peace Accords. The smash hit was spectacularly reviewed and was one of the hottest theater tickets of the year.

Best Play Nominee: “Oslo”

“Sweat” is set in a working class, Rust Belt bar in 2008. With its themes of blue-collar disaffection, “Sweat” feels like the most relevant work to today’s world. It was also awarded the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for drama.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: “Sweat,” Lynn Nottage

The cast of “Sweat” discuss “Method Boozing.” Count me in.


Best Book of a Musical

“Come From Away,” Irene Sankoff and David Hein | Review
“Dear Evan Hansen,” Steven Levenson | Review
“Groundhog Day the Musical,” Danny Rubin | Review
“Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812,” Dave Malloy | Review

What to Look for: This award recognizes the librettists for writing the story and spoken (not sung) dialogue of the musical. Both “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” and “Come From Away” are heavily weighted towards sung (rather than spoken) dialogue. “Groundhog Day,” while charming, doesn’t have the emotional depth of “Dear Evan Hansen.” It’s hard to imagine anyone other than Steven Levenson taking this one home.

Dear Evan Hansen best book musical

Best Book of a Musical Nominee: “Dear Evan Hansen,” Steven Levenson



Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theater

“Come From Away,” music & lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein | Cast Recording
“Dear Evan Hansen,” music & lyrics by Benj Pasek & Justin Paul | Cast Recording
“Groundhog Day the Musical,” music & lyrics by Tim Minchin | Cast Recording
“Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812,” music & lyrics by Dave Malloy | Cast Recording

What to Look for: “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” stands out for sheer innovation in every category in which it’s been honored. Plenty has been written about its revolutionary staging and lighting design (more on that later), but the score takes plenty of risks, too. By blending elements of traditional Russian folk with EDM and even indie rock, composer Dave Malloy pushed past people’s expectations of what a Broadway musical is supposed to sound like.

Best Original Score Nominee: “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812,” music & lyrics by Dave Malloy

But don’t count out “Dear Evan Hansen,” which was composed by Benj Pasek & Justin Paul. They took home an Oscar this year for their music in “La La Land” and are likely contenders for a Grammy nomination next year. Will Tony voters help them get one step closer to the EGOT?

Vendini’s Pick to Win: “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”
Dark Horse: “Dear Evan Hansen”

Best Original Score Nominee: “Dear Evan Hansen”


Best Revival of a Play

“August Wilson’s Jitney” | Review
“Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” | Review
“Present Laughter” | Review
“Six Degrees of Separation” | Review

What to Look for: This is a tough one to call, but we’re going with “August Wilson’s Jitney.” Wilson is having a moment right now (albeit posthumously) after the film adaptation of his play “Fences” scored four Oscar nominations earlier this year. We’re betting Tony voters will take the opportunity to honor this under-seen work as well as the overall body of work of this great playwright.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: “August Wilson’s Jitney”
Dark Horse: “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”

Best Revival of a Play Nominee: “August Wilson’s Jitney”


Best Revival of a Musical

“Falsettos” | Review
“Hello, Dolly!” | Review
“Miss Saigon” | Review

What to Look for: You’d be hard pressed to find three musicals this dissimilar from each other. “Falsettos” is a funny and poignant story about the early days of the AIDS crisis, told on a human scale. “Miss Saigon” offers the height of bombast, with its famous chopper scene that hovers somewhere between moving and melodramatic.

Best Revival of a Musical Nominee: “Falsettos”

Rounding out the category is “Hello, Dolly,” a production so ubiquitous that it’s the first thing you think of when you hear the words “Broadway Musical.” While “Falsettos” earned stellar reviews, it’s hard to imagine voters not giving the award to “Hello, Dolly!” After a decades-long hiatus from performing in a Broadway show, Midler’s return wasn’t just a homecoming. It was a tour de force.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: “Hello, Dolly!”
Dark Horse: It would be a major upset, but nobody would be mad if “Falsettos” surprised everyone.

If you’ve only seen high school productions of “Hello, Dolly!,” I can assure you that this one is better.


Best Actor in a Leading Role in a Play

Denis Arndt, “Heisenberg” | Interview
Chris Cooper, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Review
Corey Hawkins, “Six Degrees of Separation” | Interview
Kevin Kline, “Present Laughter” | Interview
Jefferson Mays, “Oslo” | Interview

What to Look for: This year’s field offers a balance of Broadway favorites (like Jefferson Mays) and film stars who made their bones on the stage (Oscar winner Chris Cooper made his Broadway debut in 1980.) As a two-time Tony and one-time Oscar-winning actor, Kevin Kline fits nicely in both categories. In Noël Coward’s “Present Laughter,” he plays an aging matinee idol, a character that utilizes Kline’s incredible charm and gift for physical comedy. It’s the funniest, most joyous role in the bunch.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Kevin Kline, “Present Laughter”
Dark Horse: Jefferson Mays, “Oslo”

Kevin Kline in Present Laughter best leading actor

Best Actor in a Leading Role in a Play Nominee: Kevin Kline, “Present Laughter”


Best Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Cate Blanchett, “The Present” | Review
Jennifer Ehle, “Oslo” | Review
Sally Field, “The Glass Menagerie” | Review
Laura Linney, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” | Review
Laurie Metcalf, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Review

What to Look for: The novel casting choice for “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” has an impact on the entire field this year. The leading role of Regina Giddens alternates between actresses Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon on any given night, with the actress not appearing as Regina playing her sister-in-law, Birdie. Due to the nominating rules, only one actress can be nominated for an individual role in a production. While Laura Linney captured this nomination, her co-star Cynthia Nixon got the nod for Best Actress in a Featured Role in a Play. Either actress could have been honored for both roles.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Laura Linney, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
Dark Horse: Sally Field, “The Glass Menagerie.” Because you can never discount Broadway’s love for Sally Field (or the desire to see her give a speech on stage.)

Laura Linney in Lillie Hellmans Little Foxes best leading actress

Best Actress in a Leading Role in a Play Nominee: Laura Linney, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”


Best Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical

Christian Borle, “Falsettos” | Interview
Josh Groban, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview
Andy Karl, “Groundhog Day the Musical” | Interview
David Hyde Pierce, “Hello, Dolly!” | Interview
Ben Platt, “Dear Evan Hansen” | Interview

What to Look for: The big acting categories are sometimes where Tony voters can get a little starstruck. This should indicate good news for mega-recording artist Josh Groban and two-time Tony-winner David Hyde Pierce.

David Hyde Pierce in Hello Dolly best lead actor musical

Best Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical Nominee: David Hyde Pierce, “Hello, Dolly!”

Photo by Julieta Cervantes

But Tony voters also love a star-making performance, which is what Ben Platt delivered in “Dear Evan Hansen.” If such a thing as a sympathy vote exists, it should go to Andy Karl. He made national news when he injured himself during a performance of “Groundhog Day the Musical” and finished the Broadway show whilst in excruciating pain.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Ben Platt, “Dear Evan Hansen”
Dark Horse: Josh Groban, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Watch Ben Platt bring Stephen Colbert to tears following a performance on “The Late Show”


Best Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical

Denée Benton, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview
Christine Ebersole, “War Paint” | Review
Patti LuPone, “War Paint” | Review
Bette Midler, “Hello, Dolly!” | Review
Eva Noblezada, “Miss Saigon” | Review

What to Look for: Three of the greatest Divas of all time, Patti LuPone, Christine Ebersole and Bette Midler are all nominated in the same category. We expect to see the votes split between LuPone and Ebersole, giving the Divine Miss M. the win. But there’s also a real possibility that the three Grande Dames could all split the vote, handing the ingénue Denée Benton a Tony for her Broadway debut in “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812.”

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Bette Midler, “Hello, Dolly!”
Dark Horse: Denée Benton, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Best Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical Nominee: Bette Midler, “Hello, Dolly!”


Best Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Michael Aronov, “Oslo” | Review
Danny DeVito, “Arthur Miller’s the Price” | Review
Nathan Lane, “The Front Page” | Interview
Richard Thomas, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” | Interview
John Douglas Thompson, “August Wilson’s Jitney” | Interview

What to Look for: Going up against a living legend like Nathan Lane for a Tony Award seems like a heady challenge, but this year it might actually be to the advantage of the other actors. Lane has delivered so many definitive performances that at this point he’s really competing against his own legacy. Sure, he was excellent in “The Front Page.” But was it even in his own top five Broadway performances?

Nathan Lane in Front Page featured role

Best Actor in a Featured Role in a Play: Nathan Lane, “The Front Page”

We’re picking Danny DeVito for the win. His scene-stealing turn in Arthur Miller’s “The Price,” was no small feat. Especially considering that it was the veteran screen actor’s Broadway debut.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Danny DeVito, “Arthur Miller’s the Price”
Dark Horse: Richard Thomas, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”

Danny DeVito in Arthur Millers Price featured role

Best Actor in a Featured Role in a Play Nominee: Danny DeVito

Photo courtesy of Playbill


Best Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Johanna Day, “Sweat” | Interview
Jayne Houdyshell, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Review
Cynthia Nixon, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” | Interview
Condola Rashad, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Interview
Michelle Wilson, “Sweat” | Interview

What to Look for: Cynthia Nixon is nominated for Best Actress in a Featured Role for “Little Foxes,” but she played the lead in the same play just as often. Frankly, she should have been nominated for both roles if the rules had allowed it. With Laura Linney heavily favored to win for her leading role, it would almost seem cruel for voters to deny Nixon, especially considering her mastery in playing both roles.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Cynthia Nixon, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”
Dark Horse: Michelle Wilson, “Sweat”

Cynthia Nixon in Lillian Hellmans Little Foxes best actress featured role

Best Actress in a Featured Role in a Play Nominee: Cynthia Nixon, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”

Photo by Jason Bell



Best Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Gavin Creel, “Hello, Dolly!” | Interview
Mike Faist, “Dear Evan Hansen” | Interview
Andrew Rannells, “Falsettos” | Interview
Lucas Steele, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Review
Brandon Uranowitz, “Falsettos” | Interview

What to Look for: Andrew Rannells’ charming performance in “Falsettos” delighted audiences and theater critics in equal measure. It’s worth pointing out that Rannells’ film and TV career has exploded over the past few years with a lead in “The New Normal” and roles on shows like “How I Met Your Mother” and “Girls.” The fact that he keeps coming back to the Broadway stage (he was the breakout star of “Book of Mormon”) is likely to be rewarded with a statue.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Andrew Rannells, “Falsettos”
Dark Horse: Mike Faist, “Dear Evan Hansen”

Andrew Rannells in Falsettos featured role musical

If there was an award for “Cutest Smile,” Andrew Rannells would win that, too.

Photo courtesy of TV Guide


Best Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical

Kate Baldwin, “Hello, Dolly!” | Review
Stephanie J. Block, “Falsettos” | Review
Jenn Colella, “Come From Away” | Review
Rachel Bay Jones, “Dear Evan Hansen” | Interview
Mary Beth Peil, “Anastasia”

What to Look for: It’s hard to imagine “Dear Evan Hansen” having the same level of impact without Rachel Bay Jones’ brilliant performance as Heidi Hansen. Stephanie J. Block is the veteran in this field, and she’s long been deserving of some Tony love. But Jenn Colella truly delivered a breakout performance in “Come From Away,” this year’s most ensemble-based musical.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Jenn Colella, “Come From Away”
Dark Horse: Rachel Bay Jones, “Dear Evan Hansen”

Fly the friendly skies with Jenn Colella and the cast of “Come From Away”


Best Direction of a Play

Sam Gold, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Interview
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, “August Wilson’s Jitney” | Interview
Bartlett Sher, “Oslo” | Review
Daniel Sullivan, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” | Review
Rebecca Taichman, “Indecent” | Interview

What to Look for: The hands down favorite here is Bartlett Sher for “Oslo.” Telling such a dense, intricate story while keeping the audience engaged for three hours is a notable accomplishment for any director. Even one as accomplished as the legendary Bartlett Sher.

If there’s one surprise in this category, it’s that Kate Whoriskey wasn’t recognized with a nomination for her work on the most timely play of the year, “Sweat.”

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Bartlett Sher, “Oslo”
Dark Horse: Daniel Sullivan, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes”

Want to know what goes into being a Tony Award-winning director? Bartlett Sher can tell you.


Best Direction of a Musical

Christopher Ashley, “Come From Away” | Interview
Rachel Chavkin, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview
Michael Greif, “Dear Evan Hansen” | Interview
Matthew Warchus, “Groundhog Day the Musical” | Review
Jerry Zaks, “Hello, Dolly!” | Review

What to Look for: In any other year this would be a horse race between the timeless classic, “Hello, Dolly!” and the instant classics, “Dear Evan Hansen” and “Come From Away.” But innovation changes the competition this year, which is why we’re picking Rachel Chavkin to win at the 2017 Tony Awards. Her bold choices made “The Great Comet” the most surprising Broadway show in 2017.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Rachel Chavkin, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812.”
Dark Horse: Christopher Ashley, “Come From Away”

Director Rachel Chavkin talks about the inception of “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”


Best Scenic Design of a Play

David Gallo, “August Wilson’s Jitney” | Interview
Nigel Hook, “The Play That Goes Wrong” | Review
Douglas W. Schmidt, “The Front Page” | Review
Michael Yeargan, “Oslo” | Interview

What to Look for: This is another very diverse field for the 2017 Tony Awards. “August Wilson’s Jitney” has a deeply funky vibe, “Oslo” offers a chilly minimalism and “The Front Page” has a look that grabs you by the collar and speaks very quickly in a Mid-Atlantic accent.

Jitney scenic design

Best Scenic Design of a Play: David Gallo, “August Wilson’s Jitney”

Photo by Joan Marcus

“The Play That Goes Wrong” sets the action in what at first appears to be an ordinary drawing-room. But designer Nigel Hook cleverly turns the set itself into an important character in the show: {Spoiler alert ahead} the room is thoroughly booby-trapped and delivers as many surprises (and gets as many laughs) as the cast itself does.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Nigel Hook, “The Play That Goes Wrong”
Dark Horse: Douglas W. Schmidt, “The Front Page”

Play Goes Wrong scenic design

Best Scenic Design of a Play Nominee: Nigel Hook, “The Play That Goes Wrong”


Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Rob Howell, “Groundhog Day the Musical” | Review
David Korins, “War Paint” | Review
Mimi Lien, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Profile
Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!” | Review

What to Look for: Once again, this has to go to “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812.” Mimi Lien’s scenic design is revolutionary in the way it stages the entire theater—all the way out to the lobby. With its success, will other creators also start reimagining the conventions that separate the audience from the performance? If “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812″ performs as well at the 2017 Tony Awards as we think it will, it could have a big influence on how producers present Broadway shows in the years to come.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Mimi Lien, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Natasha Pierre and Great Comet 1812 scenic design

Scenic Design of a Musical Nominee: Mimi Lien, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”


Best Costume Design of a Play

Jane Greenwood, “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” | Profile
Susan Hilferty, “Present Laughter” | Interview
Toni-Leslie James, “August Wilson’s Jitney” | Interview
David Zinn, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Interview

What to Look for: Both “Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes” and “A Doll’s House, Part 2” take place in the late 1890’s. We’re guessing that’s going to split their votes. Which leaves the 1939 Noël Coward play, “Present Laughter” in a head-to-head competition with “August Wilson’s Jitney,” set in funky Philadelphia of the early 1970s. It’s all coming down to a battle between butterfly collars and silken cravats.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Toni-Leslie James, “August Wilson’s Jitney”

Jitney costume design

Best Costume Design of a Play Nominee: Toni-Leslie James, “August Wilson’s Jitney”


Best Costume Design of a Musical

Linda Cho, “Anastasia” | Interview
Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!” | Interview
Paloma Young, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview
Catherine Zuber, “War Paint” | Interview

What to Look for: If there’s one category at the 2017 Tony Awards that “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” didn’t revolutionize, it would be costume design. Which makes this field a little more level than others this year. That being the case, it’s going to be hard to top the classic Broadway costuming Santo Loquasto created for “Hello, Dolly!”

Hello Dolly costume design

Best Costume Design of a Musical Nominee: Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!”

Photo by Julieta Cervantes/Courtesy of Playbill

“War Paint” takes place in the high-stakes, high-glamour world of cosmetics titans, Elizabeth Arden and Helena Rubinstein. Catherine Zuber’s gorgeous costumes are practically characters in themselves, which is why we’re going with “War Paint.”

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Catherine Zuber, “War Paint”
Dark Horse: Santo Loquasto, “Hello, Dolly!”

War paint costume design

Best Costume Design of a Musical Nominee: Catherine Zuber, “War Paint”


Best Lighting Design of a Play

Christopher Akerlind, “Indecent” | Profile
Jane Cox, “August Wilson’s Jitney” | Review
Donald Holder, “Oslo” | Profile
Jennifer Tipton, “A Doll’s House, Part 2” | Review

What to Look for: Donald Holder and Jennifer Tipton are both titans in this field. Holder is a two-time Tony Award winner who’s notched a stunning 11 nominations in his career. Tipton has been the lighting designer for the American Ballet Theatre since 1971 and is a bona fide MacArthur Foundation Genius. Both are great artists, but Donald Holder’s lighting design played a more crucial role due to the minimalist set of “Oslo.”

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Donald Holder, “Oslo”
Dark Horse: Jennifer Tipton, “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Oslo lighting design

Best Lighting Design of a Play Nominee: Donald Holder, “Oslo”

Photo by Sara Krulwich/Courtesy of The New York Times


Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Howell Binkley, “Come From Away” | Review
Natasha Katz, “Hello, Dolly!” | Review
Bradley King, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview
Japhy Weideman, “Dear Evan Hansen” | Feature

What to Look for: Who knew that Lighting Design of a Musical would deliver one of the greatest star turns for the 2017 Tony Awards? But that’s exactly what it is for Bradley King, the man responsible for making “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” such a magically illuminating production.

Natasha Pierre and Comet 1812 lighting design

Best Lighting Design of a Musical Nominee: Bradley King, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

King completely reimagined how lighting interacts with both the performers and the audience. Chandeliers and hanging bulbs light the show, but they don’t stop at the stage. The lighting continues strategically throughout the audience, helping to bring the drama off the boards and into the crowd. If there’s anybody who should be considered the breakout star in the technical categories this year, it’s Bradley King.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Bradley King, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Get lit with Bradley King and “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”


Choreography

Andy Blankenbuehler, “Bandstand” | Interview
Peter Darling and Ellen Kane, “Groundhog Day the Musical” | Review
Kelly Devine, “Come From Away” | Interview
Denis Jones, “Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical” | Profile
Sam Pinkleton, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Sam Pinkleton, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Best Choreography Nominee: Denis Jones, “Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical”


Orchestrations

Bill Elliott and Greg Anthony Rassen, “Bandstand” | Review
Larry Hochman, “Hello, Dolly!” | Interview
Alex Lacamoire, “Dear Evan Hansen” | Interview
Dave Malloy, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812” | Interview

What to Look for: Alex Lacamoire was the genius music supervisor for “Hamilton.” In a pretty even field, we feel like that’s going to give him an edge at the 2017 Tony Awards.

Vendini’s Pick to Win: Alex Lacamoire, “Dear Evan Hansen”
Dark Horse: Dave Malloy, “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”

Orchestrations Nominee: Bill Elliott and Greg Anthony Rassen, “Bandstand”


We hope you enjoyed reading our coverage of the 2017 Tony Awards as much as we enjoyed making it for you. On behalf of Vendini, we would like to congratulate everyone nominated this year. Your creative efforts enrich our lives and culture every day. Thank you.

Finally, don’t forget to download Vendini’s (Unofficial) 2017 Tony Awards Ballot! If you can beat Team Vendini to pick the most winners for the 2017 Tony Awards, you’ll be automatically entered to win a $50 gift card!